Research Tuesday: “Being Smart: Challenges in the Use of Mobile Applications in Clinical Settings”

Took a couple months off, but it’s time to rejoin Research Tuesday! Time to share and critique more research, thanks to the SLP Blogger challenge set up by Rachel Wynn over at Gray Matter Therapy. I’m re-entering the challenge with a review of an article on using apps in a clinical setting. (Oh, how appropriate.) It also isn’t exactly a research study, but rather a review of the present state of affairs, introduction to current issues, and suggestions for guidelines. It also provides a good overview of the numbers and preliminary research (and lack thereof) that is available.

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Conversation TherAppy

Oh, my. Has it really been over six months since I’ve done an app review? Time to get back on track! Update on me: I’ve switched from acute inpatient to a rehab facility (rehab, SNF, LTC). There are things I miss about acute, but I am excited about the new position, especially being able to use apps in therapy again! In other words, hopefully you’ll be seeing more of me. :) The number one app I’ve used so far is Conversation TherAppy. The app has been out for a number of months now, but I’ve used it so much in the past two weeks that it’s impossible NOT to share about it. (And I even found a few times to use it in acute, so I’ll share about that, too.)

App: Conversation TherAppy

What It Is: An app for stimulating conversation by Tactus Therapy.

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Research Tuesday: “Clinical Utility of the 3-Ounce Water Swallow Test”

Once again, it’s time for research Tuesday! And once again, I’m pondering dysphagia. First, to give a little credit where credit is due, I wanted to disclose that my inspiration for this post came from Jonathan Waller over at Dysphagia Cafe. His past couple posts (see here and here) have had me seriously reconsidering my (albeit very early and still-developing) understanding of aspiration, particularly the silent variety. He points out that silent aspiration may not actually be so silent after all, and that it is widely misunderstood and overly feared by clinicians. So, in an effort to not be misunderstanding and fearful, I delved into this article.

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#SLPeepsville Photo Challenge Winners!

As you may have seen, the #SLPeeps blew up Twitter (and Facebook and Instagram) last month with the #SLPeepsville “Why You Love Where You Live” photo-of-the-day challenge. Over 250 photos were submitted by over 25 SLPs (and honorary SLPs) all over North America. It was so much fun to see everyone’s choices and how each of you chose to represent where you live. I must say, we got some gorgeous photos out of it, too! Not to mention some ideas for future vacations and roadtrips.

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Get Yapping: How to Voice Your App Opinions

As you may know, I am a huge social media user. I am constantly all over Twitter and Facebook (and blogs, of course), and I dabble in Pinterest, Google+, Reddit, LinkedIn, Instagram………..well, you get the point. Last year, if you had asked me the best way to find and critique good apps, I would have recommended you use a combination of all of these. “Facebook, Twitter, and blogs will be the most useful,” I would have said. “Join the SLPs Talk Apps group on Facebook, start following #SLPeeps on Twitter, and read blogs like Speech Techie and Speaking of Apps.”

While I still use all of these invaluable resources, it’s not incredibly time efficient. On Facebook, the same questions get asked over and over again, there is no organized way to make thorough or consistent recommendations, and although the posts are made by individuals, intentions are not always transparent. Twitter is very fast-paced, and it is hit-or-miss whether people with real knowledge will happen to see your tweet and give you the information you need. Blogs are far more organized and have credible reviews, but that means keeping up with each of them and constantly perusing old material to find the content that you want. Oh, and there are those fantastic app lists that hard-working SLP bloggers have put together, but they typically reflect introductory information, and you usually still need to do plenty more research to determine if the app is worth your purchase. Is anyone else stressed out yet?! Can’t we just have one place to search for apps that brings together all the features we want: organization, credible and verifiable reviews, consistency, community, efficient and various searching methods, and a uniform rating system? Well, perhaps we can… :)

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Research Tuesday: “Dysphagic Independent Feeders’ Justifications for Noncompliance With Recommendations by a Speech-Language Pathologist”

Can you believe it’s already the second Tuesday of the month?! Where has time gone. We are continuing the SLP Blogger challenge set up by Rachel Wynn over at Talks Just Fine! Which means it is time to share and critique more research. (If you missed last month’s posts, here is a summary of all the articles people reviewed–even if I’m not reviewing something pertinent to your caseload, I’m positive at least one of the other bloggers is!)

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#SLPeepsville: Why You Love Where You Live Photo-of-the-Day Challenge!

It’s that time of year again! You know, the time where the weather warms up and we’re all happy with where we live again. ;) Oh, and the time where the #SLPeeps start dreaming up photo-of-the-day challenges! This year we’re combining those two things, and Speechie Apps gets to host. What does this have to do with SLPs and technology, you ask? Well, er, it will be a bunch of SLPs increasing camaraderie via technology! And it will be fun. And there will be prizes! So, here’s the deal…

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Sunny Articulation & Phonology Test

My under-18 caseload has been significantly limited the past few months, so I haven’t been reviewing many children’s apps. However, I did use this app to assess several kids, and I wanted to share my thoughts!

App: Sunny Articulation & Phonology Test

What It Is: An app for assessing articulation and phonological abilities by Smarty Ears.

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Research Tuesday: “The Effect of Twitter on College Student Engagement and Grades”

If you haven’t heard, Rachel Wynn over at Talks Just Fine has started a SLP Blogger challenge of sorts! Every second Tuesday, a group of bloggers will share and critique a piece of research. The thought is that we all could stand to read more research and be exposed to research that others find. If you’re an SLP Blogger, head over to Rachel’s blog and email her about participating! The more the merrier. :D

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AAC Evaluation Genie

SLPeeps, I have been a terrible SLPBlogger the past few months, and I apologize. Graduate school is finally over (!), and end-of-degree busyness is no longer a priority! I’m on vacation this week, so I’m all yours. ;) And what better time to start back up than Better Hearing and Speech Month?! So, what new apps have I been using the past month or two? Well, working with adults since January, I of course have been using my Tactus Therapy apps like crazy (read my thoughts on this one and this one). In addition, however, I have started using a new AAC evaluation app. I bought it a little while back but only recently have had a frequent use for it. Without further ado…

App: AAC Evaluation Genie

What It Is: An informal diagnostic tool for determining the AAC-related skills of an individual by Hump Software.

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